Behavior Technician - Level 1 Syllabus


Purpose: The Behavior Technician Level One certificate program provides a standardized, peer-reviewed, evidence-based training program for paraprofessionals.

 

The Behavior Technician Level One certificate program is designed as an entry level training program for those paraprofessionals entering the workforce in the role of a behavior technician.  The certificate program provides a fundamental training component in the foundations of professionalism, advocacy, positive behavior supports, autism, and the role of the paraprofessional as a behavior technician.

 

Course Description:  This program will prepare candidates with a strong basic foundation in the basic concepts and principles of applied behavior analysis within the context of autism treatment and person centered approaches. This course is intended for workforce development to address an immediate broad service need. This course provides the foundation for the next steps in advanced education and training in ABA and Autism. 

 

This course utilizes principles from behavior analysis to teach the course, including those borrowed from the Keller Method, frequent assessment and feedback in the form of “probes,” and adult education methods.  

 

Eligibility Requirements:

  1. I can verify that I have a minimum of a High School Diploma or equivalent

  2. I can verify that I am at least 18 years old.

  3. I agree that if my course or program tuition is being paid for by my employer, CoAHS can provide the following information should the employer request it:

    • Identifying information

    • Progress measures

    • Academic Transcript

  4. I agree that upon completion I can be put on the Behavior Technician public registry

  5. I agree to the Standard Terms and Conditions

  6. I agree to the Conduct Code for Behavior Technician Level One Certificate Holders

 

Fees and Refunds:

  • The published fee on the website is due at time of enrollment.

  • Questions about refunds should be referred to our Refund Policy.

 

Program Completion Requirements:

  • Recommendation by immediate Supervisor (professor, teacher, mentor, work supervisor) 

  • Completion of 45 hours of coursework and instructional supports and probe quizzes at 90% criteria pass rate 

  • Complete 4 instructor-led exercises overseen by a BCBA-D 

  • Verification of a minimum of 15 hours of “on the job” training and demonstration of skills by a licensed or board certified supervisor. 

  • Pass a standardized psychometrically sound final assessment. Cut Score: 72.67 % (passing score)

  • Complete online survey for continued quality assurance and management 

  • Agree to terms and conditions (Code of Ethics, Supervision Requirements, Role of a BTL1)

  • Inclusion in public registry as a source of primary source verification for third parties

 

Class Policies:  Students are required to participate in the online courses and complete all activities and quizzes based on the 90% or higher performance criterion.  A Course Certificate will be given contingent upon completion of all course lessons, 90% average mastery of probe quizzes, passing the final exam at the current cut score, passing the written instructor exercises, and full payment of all tuition and/or fees.   

 

General issues about this course:   This course will be based upon online asynchronous interactive methods, with activities and exercises in which students will participate throughout the course.  Short quizzes will be given frequently, based upon the course content for the covered class content.

 

Classes will be conducted in an online forum and will be self-paced by the student.

 

Inferences about Certificate Holders. COMPLETION OF THE BTL1 CERTIFICATE PROGRAM DOES NOT SIGNIFY THAT A PERSON IS CERTIFIED, LICENSED, ACCREDITED, OR REGISTERED TO WORK INDEPENDENTLY AS A BEHAVIOR TECHNICIAN. Individuals who have completed the BTL1 program must work under a qualified supervisor. Completion of this course signifies that the certificate holder has met the intended learning outcomes. The course can be used as the training coursework portion for BCAT, RBT, and ABAT certifications, but the full certification process must be followed in order to qualify for the certification. In some cases the certificate holder may be able to work for billable hours under some insurance providers. However, all work must be under a qualified supervisor and at the approval of their employer. 

 

Technical Requirements:  This course is offered completely online, and requires access to a computer with the following requirements.

  1. A web browser that runs HTML5

    • Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, etc

  2. The following are required for browser compatibility

    • Cookies Allowed

    • JavaScript Enabled

    • .JS Files Allowed (Javascript Files)

    • Frames Enabled

  3. The following are recommended for browser compatibility

    • Pop-up Blocker Disabled

    • Referrers Allowed

  4. Internet connection with download and upload speed of 5 Mbps

    • This is the recommended speed by the LMS. It can run on slower connections, but people might run into saving issues

 

Any questions about technical compatibility can be sent to coursehelp@coahs-edu.org

 

Course Outline and Intended Learning Outcomes

 

Lesson 1-Philosophy, Values, and Advocacy

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify the principles that underpin the philosophy and values of developmental disability support services within the school setting

  • Contrast what advocacy IS and IS NOT

 

Lesson 2-Professionalism

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Define professionalism.

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the responsibilities of the educational support staff regarding professionalism. 

 

Lesson 3-Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to: 

  • Describe Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in general.

  • List the five disorders that make up ASD.

  • Identify behaviors that may indicate possible ASD.

 

Lesson 4-Historical Definition of Autism

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify people and organizations that have played and continue to play an important role in Autism research. 

  • Explain why Autism is a biological condition. 

 

Lesson 5-The Prevalence of Autism

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Correctly identify the currently accepted prevalence of Autism in the United States.  

  • Explain possible reasons accounting for the increase in prevalence of Autism. 

 

Lesson 6: Causes of Autism Spectrum Disorders

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Describe the possible causes of Autism. 

  • Explain why there is no single definite cause of Autism. 

 

Lesson 7: Types of Challenging Behaviors

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify the types of challenging behaviors.

  • Explain how to identify which type of behavior is being displayed

 

Lesson 8: Causes of Challenging Behavior

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify the main causes of challenging behaviors.

  • Explain the functions of behaviors.

 

Lessons 9 & 10: Models for Behavior Support Planning

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify the Phases of behavior,

  • Describe the role of the Support Staff during any of the Phases of behavior. 

  • Explain the concept of Episodic Severity, and apply these skills to a scenario. 

  • Identify and evaluate the core concepts of proactive models of support. 

  • Identify and evaluate the core concepts of reactive models of support.  

 

Lesson 11: Positive Behavior Supports

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Define positive behavior supports.

  • Identify and explain strategies we can use to help address behavioral problems.

  • Define Functional behavioral assessment, and explain how this can help people with challenging behaviors. 

 

Lesson 12: Responding to Challenging Behavior

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify and explain strategies you could use to respond to challenging behaviors.

  • List things to avoid when responding to challenging behaviors.

  • Explain what is meant by the conflict cycle, and how to avoid becoming involved in it. 

 

Lessons 13 & 14: Reinforcement

As a result of completion of this Lesson, the participant will be able to demonstrate an understanding of: 

  • The difference between primary and secondary reinforcers.

  • The different types of reinforcers.  

  • How best to use reinforcers. 

  • What is meant by the three-part contingency.

  • How ABC analysis can be applied. 

  • The two main types of behavior.  

 

Lesson 15-Introduction to PRT

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the differences between traditional structured methods and naturalistic methods of teaching individuals with Autism that influenced the development of PRT.

  • List and describe the components of Pivotal Response Treatment that target motivation.

  • Describe what a pivotal behavior is.

  • Identify the four empirically supported pivotal behaviors?

 

Lesson 16: Discrete Trial Teaching (DTT)

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to: 

  • Identify the purpose of Discrete Trial Teaching.

  • Explain how Discrete Trial Teaching is conducted. 

  • Compare and contrast the benefits and limitations of Discrete Trial Teaching

  • Recall how to deliver appropriate consequences.

 

Lesson 17: Data Collection

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Explain how to collect and utilize data in effective and reliable ways.

  • Demonstrate how graphs can be used in behavioral support.

 

Lesson 18: Session Notes

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Describe what session notes are and the purpose of session notes

  • Know the difference between objective, observable behaviors and subjective opinions in session notes. 

 

Lesson 19: Person Centered Planning

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Define Person Centered Planning.

  • Describe how Person Centered Planning works to help to enable individuals with disabilities to increase their self-determination and independence. 

 

Lesson 20: Functional Communication and Visual Supports

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to: 

  • Explain what visual supports are, and how they are used. 

  • Demonstrate understanding of the goal of visual supports. 

  • Identify the different types of cards that can be used, and the purpose of each. 

  • Recall what you need to remember when creating visuals. 

 

Lesson 21: Biomedical Issues

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Evaluate the validity of different biomedical approaches to mitigate the effects of Autism. 

 

Lesson 22: Legal and Ethical Considerations

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to:

  • Identify some of the legal and ethical considerations for supporting people with challenging behaviors. 

  • Explain some ways in which you are able to strengthen your relationship with people with challenging behaviors.

 

Lesson 23: Transitioning Between Activities

As a result of completion of this module, the participant will be able to: 

  • Identify appropriate indicators to use to signify transitioning. 

  • Identify ways to enable smoother transitions between activities. 

 

Final Exam

 

After completion of the lessons and passing of the probe quizzes at 90% or higher, the student will then be asked to take a final exam. The final exam is comprised of questions from the probe quizzes already encountered throughout the course. The learner is expected to pass the final exam at the current cut score. The learner has two attempts to pass the final exam. If he or she is unable pass by the second attempt, the learner must request consideration to retake the exam again. 

 

Instructor Exercises

 

After passing the final exam, the learner moves on to the instructor exercises, which are short answer questions relating to the content of the course. The purpose of these exercises is for the student to show a higher level mastery of the concepts taught in the course. The learner enters the answers in to the allotted space in the course. The instructor manually grades the exercises. The instructor will then either pass the student, or give him/her feedback and ask the student to resubmit the answer. This exchange continues until the learner correctly answers the questions. 

 

Follow Up

Once all the steps have been passed in the course, a short survey will unlock. After completing the survey, the learner can then unlock the certificate of completion for the course. The learner can print it out or save a digital copy for his/her records. 

 

References

Axelrod, S., & Apsche, J. (1983).  The effects of punishment on human behavior.    New York: Academic Press.        

 

Baer, D.M, Wolf, M.M., & Risley, T.R. (1968).  Some current dimensions of applied behavior analysis.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 1, 91-97.

 

Carr, E.G., Horner, R.H., Turnbull, A.P.  et. al. (1999). Positive Behavior Support for People with  Developmental Disabilities.  Washington, DC: American Association on Mental Retardation.

 

Cooper, J.O., Heron, T. E., & Heward, W.L. (2007). Applied Behavior Analysis (2nd Edition). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson. 

 

Durand, M. (1993).  Functional communication training: An intervention program for severe behavior problems. New York: Guilford.

 

Hanley, G.P., Iwata, B.A., & McCord, B.E.  (2003). Functional analysis of problem behavior: A review.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 36, 147-185.

 

Iwata, B.A., Dorsey, M.F.,  Slifer, K.J.,  Bauman, K.E.,  & Richman, G.S. (1982). Toward a functional analysis of self-injury.  Analysis and Intervention in Developmental Disabilities, 2, 3-20.

 

Mace, F.C., Lalli, J.S., & Pinter Lalli, E. (1991). Functional analysis and treatment of aberrant behavior. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 12, 155-180.

 

Marcus, B.A., & Vollmer, T.R. (1996).  Combining noncontingent reinforcement and differential reinforcement schedules as treatment for aberrant behavior. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 29, 43-51.

 

O’Neill, R.E., Horner, R.H.,  Albin, R.W., Sprague, J.R., Storey, K., & Newton,  J.S. (1997).  Functional assessment and program development for problem behavior: A practical handbook. Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole.

 

Miller, L.K., (1997). Principles of everyday behavior analysis.  NY: Wadsworth. 

 

Rachlin, H. (1976).  Introduction to modern behaviorism. W.H. Freeman: San Francisco, CA.

 

Repp. A.C., & Horner, R.H. (Eds.) (1999).  Functional analysis of problem behavior: From effective assessment to effective support. Pacific Grove: CA: Brooks/Cole

 

Schindler, H.R., & Horner, R.H, (2005).  Generalized reduction of problem behavior of young children with autism.  American Journal on Mental Retardation. 110, 1, 36-47.

 

Schwartz, B. & Robbins, S.J. (1995). Chapter 8. Psychology of Learning and Behavior.  NY: Norton. 

 

Shimoff, E., & Catania, A.C.  (1998). The verbal governance of behavior. In K.A. Lattal & M. Perone (Eds.) Handbook of research methods in human operant behavior, pp. 371-404.  NY: Plenum Press.  

 

Skinner, B.F.  (1957). Verbal behavior.  NY: Appleton-Century-Crofts.

 

Sulzer-Azaroff, B. & Mayer, R.G. (1991). Chapters 4, 5, & 6. Behavior Analysis for Lasting Change. Wadsworth Publishing. 

 

Touchette, P.E., MCDonald, R.F., & Langer, S.N. (1985).  A scatter plot for identifying stimulus control of problem behavior.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 18, 261-272. 

 

Weinberg, M. (1982). Distinguishing between discriminative and motivational functions of stimuli.  Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. 37,149-155.

 

Weinberg, M. Functional assessment handout.